Ask The Expert - We are working on a low cost device that is used with a syringe. Its use results in a substantial increase in the intradermal (ID) injection success while requiring minimal training in Mantoux technique. The current use of ID vaccination is limited to BCG and rabies and TB testing. Would you please suggest vacines in development that would likely benefit from a simple ID injection device.

Published: August 28, 2013
Sponsored By: Undefined
Session Expert: Paul Offit, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia



We are working on a low cost device that is used with a syringe. Its use results in a substantial increase in the intradermal (ID) injection success while requiring minimal training in Mantoux technique. The current use of ID vaccination is limited to BCG and rabies and TB testing. Would you please suggest vacines in development that would likely benefit from a simple ID injection device.

The intradermal site is rich in dendritic cells and, consequently, an excellent site for inducing immune responses. The best current example being the intradermal influenza vaccine.

So one could reasonably argue that the site would be excellent with the exception of oral vaccines (like rotavirus or oral polio) or live attenuated viral vaccines (like measles, mumps, rubella, or varicella). Indeed, the site could be of great value for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, Hib, pneumococcus, hepatitis B, HPV, or inactivated polio vaccines. The difficulty of course is that the path to licensure of a new product going up against existing vaccines is steep.

Back To Expert Session